Socialist Worker

Nobody's watching nasty film of racism and the rich

by Jonas Liston
Published Tue 18 Sep 2012
Issue No. 2321

As I entered the cinema to watch St George’s Day, the ticket taker told me I was the first to arrive for the showing. As it turns out I was also the last. And I’m glad.

The film centres on the exploits of two London-based gangsters. They go through a drug deal with the Russian mafia, get chased around Europe by the police, and kill anyone blocking their way to wealth and protection.

Despite the appalling acting, storyline and direction of the film, it actually does expose the nature of the society we live in. It highlights the evils of capitalism, represented by the protagonist millionaire gangsters.

Their position in the film shows the role they play within the system. They compete against and co-operate with the police, the politicians and several other organs of capitalist control.

The film is laced with racist language and nationalist rhetoric. The characters’ dialogue constantly returns to the supposed “good old days” of “fighting the Germans”.

They attribute everything good in the world to Englishness (and money). And they glamourise violent football gangs.

In addition, and even by the usual gangster genre standards, the sexist objectification and degradation of women are beyond belief. Several scenes glorify prostitution and strip-dancing.

The only serious thing you can take from this film is that the richest in society are those most willing to exploit people. And it illustrates that they are intrinsically tied to the police, the judiciary and the state. All of which protect the richest, and seek to smash the poorest.

All in all, this is a film I seriously advise against seeing, unless you want to leave the cinema bored, furious and offended.

St George’s Day is on general release


Article information

Reviews
Tue 18 Sep 2012, 16:50 BST
Issue No. 2321
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